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The Most Amazing 2017 Total Solar Eclipse Photos Taken From Space.

The Most Amazing 2017 Total Solar Eclipse Photos Taken From Space.

The Eclipse 2017 Umbra Viewed from Space

The Eclipse 2017 Umbra Viewed from Space

Glory of the Heavens

This composite image progression of a partial solar eclipse over Ross Lake, in Northern Cascades National Park, Washin
This composite image shows the progression of a partial solar eclipse over Ross Lake, in Northern Cascades National Park, Washington on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe.  Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

 

The Eclipse 2017 Umbra Viewed from Space

The Eclipse 2017 Umbra Viewed from Space
iss052e056222 (Aug. 21, 2017) — As millions of people across the United States experienced a total eclipse as the umbra, or moon’s shadow passed over them, only six people witnessed the umbra from space. Viewing the eclipse from orbit were NASA’s Randy Bresnik, Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson, ESA (European Space Agency’s) Paolo Nespoli, and Roscosmos’ Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy. The space station crossed the path of the eclipse three times as it orbited above the continental United States at an altitude of 250 miles.

Last Glimmer of the Sun Above Madras, Oregon During the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse

last glimmer of the sun is seen as the moon makes its final move over the sun during the 2017 total solar eclipse.
The last glimmer of the sun is seen as the moon makes its final move over the sun during the total solar eclipse on Monday, August 21, 2017 above Madras, Oregon. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe.  Photo Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani

JSC Activities During Eclipse 2017

JSC Activities During Eclipse 2017
jsc2017e110783 (Aug. 21, 2017) — Employees at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston joined the rest of the country in experiencing the 2017 eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017. Many used protective eclipse glasses, and others made use of manufactured or pin-hole cameras of opportunity to view the eclipse. In Houston, the partial eclipse duration was 2 hours, 59 minutes, reaching its maximum level of 70 percent at 1:16 p.m. CDT. Some members of the team supporting the International Space Station in the Christopher C. Kraft Mission Control Center took advantage of a break in their duties to step outside the windowless building to witness what their colleagues in orbit also saw and documented with a variety of camera

JSC Activities During Eclipse 2017

JSC Activities During Eclipse 2017

JSC Activities During Eclipse 2017

JSC Activities During Eclipse 2017

The Eclipse 2017 from Space

The Eclipse 2017 from Space

SDO Views 2017 Solar Eclipse

image of moon crossing in front of the sun, from SDO
Image of the Moon transiting across the Sun, taken by SDO in 304 angstrom extreme ultraviolet light on Aug. 21, 2017.  Credit: NASA/SDO

 

The Bailey’s Beads Effect During the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse

Bailey's Beads During 2017 Total Solar Eclipse
The Bailey’s Beads effect is seen as the moon makes its final move over the sun during the total solar eclipse on Monday, August 21, 2017 above Madras, Oregon. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe.  Photo Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani

 

SDO Views 2017 Solar Eclipse

image of moon crossing in front of the sun, from SDO
Image of the Moon transiting across the Sun, taken by SDO in 171 angstrom extreme ultraviolet light on Aug. 21, 2017. Credit: NASA/SDO

 

2017 Solar Eclipse

2017 Total Solar Eclipse
A total solar eclipse is seen on Monday, August 21, 2017 above Madras, Oregon. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe.  Photo Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani

via : nasa.gov

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